What to Know About Performing Employee Background Checks

What To Know About Performing Employee Background Checks

While conducting reference checks on potential employees is a sensible way of managing your business risk, employers must carefully follow legal limits on the type and extent of background checks they can conduct.

While conducting reference checks on potential employees is a sensible way of managing your business risk, employers must carefully follow legal limits on the type and extent of background checks they can conduct.

First, when making inquiries into an applicant’s past, ask for the consent of the applicant and get approval in writing. Inform the applicant (in writing) whom you will contact and what questions you will ask.

Your state may have additional regulations, so it’s generally a good idea to check with your attorney to review your liabilities. For example, some states do not allow background checks into criminal records unless it’s required for a specific profession. In most states, employers are not entitled to research several types of records without written permission, including bankruptcy, credit history, medical records and worker’s compensation records, military service and educational history.

Local governments usually make driving records available, sometimes for a nominal fee. To minimize legal exposure, limit your background checks to issues that relate closely to the job for which you are hiring.

On the flip side, companies may be held legally accountable — and sued for negligent hiring — if they do not perform certain types of background checks. Examples include checking driving records for service or delivery personnel and checking criminal records for positions that involve handling of confidential data or financial information.

You May Also Like

Veterans Can Be Heroes Off the Battlefield Too

Veterans can bring great value to the civilian workplace, in terms of technical skills and leadership abilities.

The brave men and women who serve in the U.S. military are accustomed to facing and overcoming adversity during their service. For many veterans and service members, however, transitioning back into civilian life can present a new set of challenges.

One of the biggest challenges is assimilating back into the workforce. As veterans look for employment, many struggle “to communicate, in nonmilitary terms, about the skills they have developed,” according to an online toolkit published by the Rand Corp. “Many veterans may not even realize the extent to which training, education and on-the-job experiences in the military have helped them build skills that make them competitive for civilian jobs.”

Training Continues To Be A Critical Business Requirement

We want you to realize how training helps, where you can get it and why It matters.

Industry Thrives Due To Strength In Numbers

The automotive aftermarket is filled with great people. In fact, many say it’s our strong suit.

Women In Auto Care Launches New Community Engagement Platform

MentorCity will now serve as the hub for all Women in Auto Care community engagement.

‘Strike it Rich’ By Investing In Yourself

With positive attitudes and actions you’ll give yourself the best chance to reach or exceed your goals.

Other Posts

Why Is NHTSA Involved With RTR?

An opinion is one thing, but will NHTSA handle technicians filing complaints about being locked out of a vehicle?

Do OEM Service Bays Offer Opposition or opportunity?

With great power, of course, comes great responsibility.

Read September’s Digital Edition of ShopOwner

Every issue of ShopOwner includes valuable business management and technical editorial content.

Ignition System Tests You Should (And Shouldn’t) Follow

Do your technicians use tests that might give inconclusive results or do damage to the coil or drivers inside a module?