New York DWI Law Results in More Business for Automotive Repair Shops -
Connect with us

Uncategorized

Close Sidebar Panel Open Sidebar Panel

Uncategorized

New York DWI Law Results in More Business for Automotive Repair Shops

A new law in New York requires motorists convicted of driving while intoxicated to have breath alcohol ignition interlock devices installed on their vehicles. Buckley’s Automotive in Horseheads, NY, has already installed 10 interlock units since the law took effect.

Advertisement

A new law in New York requires motorists convicted of driving while intoxicated to have breath alcohol ignition interlock devices installed on their vehicles. Buckley’s Automotive in Horseheads, NY, has already installed 10 interlock units since the law took effect.

Click Here to Read More
Advertisement

Below is the article as it appeared on the Star Gazette website.

DWI law means business for auto repair shops

By G. Jeffrey Aaron
October 21, 2010

Jody Mark Buckley, manager of Buckley's Automotive in Horseheads demonstrates the use of Smart Start's breath alcohol ignition interlock device. (G. Jeffrey Aaron / Staff Photo)A new state law is giving local auto repair shops a new revenue source as people convicted of drunken driving are subject to more oversight.

The shops are installing more breath alcohol ignition interlocks, court-ordered devices placed in vehicles owned by motorists convicted of driving while intoxicated.

Almost all states require the devices. New York’s new law took effect Aug. 15. Before the law, courts decided on a case-by-case basis if an offender would be required to have the device.

Advertisement

The new law only affects motorists convicted of driving while intoxicated, said Sandra Mentuck, director of Chemung County’s Probation Department. Those convicted of driving while impaired or driving under the influence of drugs are not required to install the devices on their vehicles.

According to the state Traffic Safety Committee, about 2,000 New York motorists have ignition interlock systems in their vehicles; that number includes devices installed before the new law took effect.

Once the interlocks are connected to the vehicle’s ignition system, drivers have to blow into a hand-held breathalyzer before they try to start the vehicle. If the system detects alcohol on the breath above the legal limit for intoxication — .08 percent in New York — the ignition is disabled and the vehicle will not start.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Click to comment
Connect
Shop Owner Magazine