How much U.S. EV infrastructure is enough?

How much U.S. EV infrastructure is enough?

As charging technology changes, so will our estimates of infrastructure needed to keep up with EV adoption.

Talk to anyone who doesn’t consider EVs to be the bee’s knees and charging will inevitably come up. We don’t have enough! Where’s it all going to go? Where’s the electricity going to come from?

Legitimately, these are actually good questions. Let’s break it down.

To answer this infrastructure conundrum, EV supporters can point to the over 140,000 EV charging stations currently deployed across the U.S. – hey, that’s a lot!

However… no it’s not. Today, with so few EVs on the road, maybe this will do, but according to a recent study by S&P Global Mobility, we’re really going to need to pick up the pace. Even when home-installed chargers are taken into account, to properly match forecasted EV sales demand, the U.S. will need to see the number of EV chargers quadruple between now and 2025, and grow more than eight-fold by 2030.

Now, a study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States found that a ratio of one public charging station for every 10 to 20 EVs in a given area would be, in general, sufficient to meet the charging needs of most EV drivers.

With that in mind, new vehicle EV market share is likely to reach 40% by 2030, at which point the total number of EVs in operation could reach 28.3 million units.

To support that EV car parc, S&P says by 2027 there will be a need for about 1.2 million Level 2 chargers and 109,000 Level 3 chargers deployed nationally. Looking to 2030, with the assumption of 28.3 million EVs on U.S. roads, an estimated total of 2.13 million Level 2 and 172,000 Level 3 public chargers will be required – all in addition to the units that consumers put in their own garages.

A 2020 report by the Rocky Mountain Institute estimates that total number to be around 4 million chargers total by 2030 to support a fleet of 28 million electric vehicles.

So, we aren’t quite on the right pace to meet EV projections – but there is hope. Currently, 35 states have signed on for federal assistance under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, of which $7.5 billion is earmarked for EV charging infrastructure. Now, the Biden Administration has pledged that the government will fund the installation of half a million charging stations – but, of course, that’s small potatoes in the grand scheme.

One more beacon of hope is this: Technology, believe it or not, changes.

Battery swapping, wireless charging, and even the increased deployment of DC wallbox solutions at home are three solutions that will change the landscape. In China and Vietnam, battery swapping is starting to catch on, though it’s virtually nowhere in Europe and the U.S. Not to mention, there are numerous companies working on EV batteries with completely different chemical compositions. If any of these should catch on, who knows what it will mean for charging as we know it.

You May Also Like

Toyota To Build EV SUVs At Indiana Facility

Toyota’s Indiana facility will build the EV Toyota Sienna, Highlander, Grand Highlander and Lexus TX.

Toyota will prepare for the assembly of an all-new, three-row battery electric SUV in the U.S. as part of a new $1.4 dbillion investment in its Princeton, IN facility, bringing the total investment in Toyota Indiana to $8 billion. This also brings the addition of up to 340 new jobs in the area, Toyota said.

Clarios Formalizes Joint Development Agreement with Altris

Partnership will develop sodium ion cells for low-voltage battery technology systems, software and integration.

Hybrid Vehicles To Gain Market Share, Cloud Theory Finds

With regulatory deadlines relaxed, some experts say hybrids will gain more customer interest.

New Report Examines EV Impact On Scrapped Tires

Coalition estimates 12% increase in scrap tires that will be produced as drivers transition to EVs.

Toyota Explores Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling

The joint research project with Argonne National Labs seeks to utilize a new process for recovering critical battery materials.

Other Posts

Do EVs Require Special Brake Pads?

Proper brake pad selection is crucial for EVs to ensure consistent stopping power and long pad life.

Grid management at the intersection of hardware and software

Panelists discuss the need for renewable energy generation and the benefits of managing EV charging hyperlocally.

New Lucid Air Grand Touring Model Has 516-mile Range

The 2024 Air Grand Touring has an EPA-estimated range of 516 miles and features fast charging in all weather conditions.

Emporia Releases NACS Level 2 EV Charger

The company said this new charger works directly with the Emporia Home Energy Management System.