Extreme Drivers – Yes, Your Client Is Probably One
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Severe Drivers – Yes, Your Client Probably Counts As One

Scott Shriber is a veteran of the automotive industry with four decades of experience. His 27 years with Ford Motor Co. (Dearborn, Mich.) included senior management work in the areas of customer service, field technical training, dealer profitability, fixed operations and warranty, as well as national marketing and sales experience. He has a deep understanding of both direct and indirect parts sales channels, as well as distribution through the aftermarket. During two joint venture start-ups, he gained extensive collision, IT and medium-duty truck experience. Scott joined Babcox in 2008 as publisher of BodyShop Business. In 2010, Scott was also named publisher of Counterman magazine and AMN. He remains a devoted car enthusiast and continual student of the automotive industry.

Even the most mild-mannered driver may be extreme. This video is sponsored by The Group Training Academy.

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You may think your customers have nothing in common with drag racer and rotary engine expert Rob Dahm, but in fact, they might be more similar than you think.

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Sure, the drag racer, youtuber and rotary engine lover pulls Gs on the drag strip and your customers more than likely pull away less violently from a stop light, but both of them are likely known as severe drivers.

In reality, severe driving includes many factors that most people might consider “normal” driving. Driving with heavy loads, such as pulling a boat trailer, carrying a pickup truck load of topsoil or even a van load of passengers. Operating a vehicle on rough roads or dusty environments. Heck, even the regular commute to work or trips running errands around town are likely “severe” driving.

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When an engine doesn’t have the chance to warm up completely, moisture can accumulate in the crankcase. This moisture can then contaminate the oil and – not being able to burn off – just remains in the engine. This impacts the integrity of the lubricant and causes engine damage.

Of course, oil that gets too hot can have problems of its own. As oil ages and is subjected to high heat, it starts to break down. High temperatures in oil can cause piston deposits, while at the same time causing the oil to oxidize, which increases its viscosity. When the viscosity is increased too much, it can start starving the main and rod bearings and starve the cylinder head of oil, causing even more wear.

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Today’s cars have it a little easier than they used to, because most of them come with oil change indicators telling drivers approximately when they should change the oil. But those indicators don’t say what oil should be used.

For that, your customers need to refer to their owner’s manual. Today’s engine oils are formulated to meet the most severe conditions any engine will be subjected to. But just as not every driver is the same type of severe, oils are available in multiple formulations engineered for different requirements. Automakers now require higher-quality oils to protect their latest engine designs, along with a need for lubricants to offer a greater contribution to fuel economy. ILSAC GF-6A and GF-6B improve upon GF-5 specifications in fuel economy and fuel economy retention, engine durability, wear protection for idle-stop, low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) minimization, piston cleanliness and chain wear protection.

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Valvoline’s multiple GF-6 formulations for conventional, synthetic blend high mileage and full synthetic products – as tested in the industry sequence X chain wear test – are proven across specifications to provide as much as 40 percent better wear protection, delivering greater defense against engine breakdown.

Behind the wheel, your customers may imagine themselves to be competing in the biggest race of the season, even when they’re just heading to the grocery store. Under the hood, their engines may not know the difference. Be sure to help them make the right choice for their next oil change.

Visit teamvalvoline.com to learn more.

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